We Can All be More Inclusive Photographers

Inclusive Photography In Practice

Inclusive practice isn’t something static that begins and ends with funding and an informed consent form. It’s a dynamic and evolving process, and all practitioners who are responsible for representing identities should regularly reflect and review how and why we represent people, places and communities. I truly believe that with our work comes great responsibility.

Society is currently going through a lot of introspection, and rightly so! All of us, regardless of our labels, need to consider what it really means to be an inclusive and ethical photographer. In order to help us consider this I have shared some questions below, which are taken from PhotoShelter’s excellent resource The Guide to Inclusive Photography.

 

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1. Am I perpetuating stereotypical narratives with my work?

2. Have I considered how my perspective or privilege may affect how I approach photography?

3. When selecting photos from other countries and of at-risk populations, am I applying the same standards I would apply for photos of my own community?

4. How can I expand the types of people, places (…) from which I draw story ideas and angles?

5. How many award-winning photographs feature black and brown people from the global South? How many of the photographers winning the awards are from that demographic?

 

Being honest with ourselves when considering the questions above could be the first step to better understanding what it means to be an inclusive photographer.


TPF Recommends: Podcasts

Listen & Learn 

A key skill for any photographer to develop is the ability to listen and learn, and this post is all about the importance of taking the time to listen to yourself and to others. Visual people can be easily overloaded with images in this digital world, but listening to stories can give our minds a rest while keeping us inspired! Here are some interesting podcasts which will hopefully help you do just that.

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GUAP Photography Podcasts On topics such as the importance of passion in your work, and how to turn your hobby into a paid opportunity.

The Photographers’ Gallery: Talking About Photography A variety of cultural conversations and artist talks covering a range of interesting topics.

Photo London can always be relied on to inspire us with a menu of delicious work & talks to linger over.

It’s Nice That: Photography Articles & Talks A good resource for creatives because of its holistic approach to creativity. Lots of support and guidance on offer!

 


Support in the Creative Industry

Sources of creative support

We are all going through waves of change and uncertainty right now, so receiving and offering support is more important than ever. Here are some ideas on how to do just that – hopefully they will spark some thoughts about what you need and what you can offer to others.

Mentoring for creative women inVisible Creatives has launched Mentor-at-Home, a speed-dating-style online mentorship programme.

Get a mentor! Arts Emergency helps marginalised young people overcome barriers to participation and success in the creative and cultural industries.

Join a collective or creative meet-up Rye Here Rye Now is a Peckham-based monthly meet up. They can be a great source of support & shared experience.

Don’t abandon all the ideas you have nurtured! This great article from Lecture in Progress gives some useful advice on how to do this.